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Gorsewood Primary School

Gorsewood Primary School
Gorsewood Road
Murdishaw
Runcorn
Cheshire
WA76ES

01928 712100

Headteacher: Mrs J Gregg

School holidays for Gorsewood Primary School via Halton council

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189 pupils aged 4—10y mixed gender
210 pupils capacity: 90% full

95 boys 50%

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90 girls 48%

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Last updated: June 19, 2014


Primary — Community School

URN
111176
Education phase
Primary
Establishment type
Community School
Establishment #
2383
OSGB coordinates
Easting: 355996, Northing: 380990
GPS coordinates
Latitude: 53.324, Longitude: -2.6621
Accepting pupils
4—11 years old
Census date
Jan. 16, 2014
Ofsted last inspection
April 24, 2014
Region › Const. › Ward
North West › Weaver Vale › Norton North
Area
Urban > 10k - less sparse
Free school meals %
51.90

Rooms & flats to rent in Runcorn

Schools nearby

  1. St Martin's Catholic Primary School WA76HZ (202 pupils)
  2. 0.2 miles Murdishaw West Community Primary School WA76EP (174 pupils)
  3. 0.4 miles Brookvale Comprehensive School WA76EP
  4. 0.5 miles Halton High School WA76EP
  5. 0.5 miles Ormiston Bolingbroke Academy WA76EP (902 pupils)
  6. 0.7 miles St Berteline's CofE Primary School WA76QN (300 pupils)
  7. 0.9 miles Brookvale Junior School WA76BZ
  8. 0.9 miles Brookvale Infant School WA76BZ
  9. 0.9 miles Brookvale Primary School WA76BZ (284 pupils)
  10. 1 mile Windmill Hill Primary School WA76QE (130 pupils)
  11. 1.1 mile Palacefields County Junior School WA72QW
  12. 1.1 mile Palacefields County Infant School WA72QW
  13. 1.1 mile Our Lady Mother of the Saviour Catholic Primary School WA72TP (189 pupils)
  14. 1.1 mile Palace Fields Primary School WA72QW
  15. 1.1 mile Palace Fields Primary Academy WA72QW (230 pupils)
  16. 1.2 mile Norton Priory High School WA72NT
  17. 1.3 mile The Park Primary School WA72LW (113 pupils)
  18. 1.3 mile Bridgewater Park Primary School WA72LW
  19. 1.4 mile Sandymoor WA71XU (104 pupils)
  20. 1.5 mile Daresbury Primary School WA44AJ (105 pupils)
  21. 1.6 mile Aston by Sutton Primary School WA73DB (92 pupils)
  22. 1.6 mile The Brow Community Primary School WA72HB (180 pupils)
  23. 1.6 mile Astmoor Primary School WA72JE (151 pupils)
  24. 1.6 mile St Augustine's Catholic Primary School WA72JJ (82 pupils)

List of schools in Runcorn

Ofsted report: Newer report is now available. Search "111176" on ofsted.gov.uk. latest issued April 24, 2014.

Inspection Report

Unique Reference Number111176
Local AuthorityHalton
Inspection number310526
Inspection date17 March 2008
Reporting inspectorClare Henderson

This inspection of the school was carried out under section 5 of the Education Act 2005.


Type of schoolPrimary
School categoryCommunity
Age range of pupils4-11
Gender of pupilsMixed
Number on roll (school)184
Appropriate authorityThe governing body
Date of previous school inspection27 September 2004
School addressGorsewood Road
Murdishaw, Runcorn
Cheshire WA7 6ES
Telephone number01928 712100
Fax number01928 710202
ChairMr Adrian St Claire
HeadteacherMrs L McMillan

Introduction

The inspection was carried out by an Additional Inspector. The inspector evaluated the overall effectiveness of the school and investigated the following issues: standards and achievement in mathematics; the quality of pupils' personal development and well-being, pastoral care and the strengths of tracking systems in ensuring that all pupils achieve their best. Evidence was gathered from observations of lessons, discussions with pupils and scrutiny of their work, discussions with the staff and governors, and analysis of the school's documents and parents' questionnaires. Other aspects were not investigated in detail, but the inspector found no evidence to suggest that the school's own assessments, as given in its self-evaluation, were not justified, and these have been included, where appropriate, in this report.

Description of the school

This school, average in size, serves an area characterised by high levels of social and economic disadvantage. The proportions of pupils eligible for free school meals and with learning difficulties and/or disabilities are well above average. A high number of pupils join or leave the school part-way through each year. Most pupils are White British: small proportions are of other ethnic groups. The school has gained the Healthy Schools and Activemark Gold awards.

Key for inspection grades
Grade 1Outstanding
Grade 2Good
Grade 3Satisfactory
Grade 4Inadequate

Overall effectiveness of the school

Grade: 2

This is a good school with some outstanding features. It provides good value for money. Instrumental in the school's success is the outstanding leadership of the headteacher which promotes pupils' outstanding personal development and the very high quality care that pupils receive. Leadership and management, which are good overall, includes a shared commitment of staff and governors to the belief that every child, and the needs of the child's family are important and valued. It is these aspects that parents wholeheartedly appreciate. A typical comment is, 'Whatever the need, be it a school matter or personal matter, they are there for you.'

Pupils' achievement is good. Pupils begin Year 1 with standards that are usually below those typically expected of their age. Since the last inspection, results in the school's national assessments at Year 2 in reading, writing and mathematics and at Year 6 in English, mathematics and science, have been broadly average. Current standards are in line with these results. The determination of teachers and support staff to remove any barriers to learning is evident in the kind, patient and understanding way in which pupils and their families are treated. As a result of this very effective support, pupils with learning difficulties and/or disabilities and the lower attaining pupils make good progress.

Pupils' spiritual, social, moral and cultural development is outstanding. Their enjoyment of school is reflected in excellent behaviour and enthusiasm for learning. They say they 'love school', feel safe and know there is someone to talk to if they have a problem. Taking part in daily 'wake up and shake up' sessions helps pupils' readiness to learn and develops their awareness of the need to lead a healthy lifestyle. Pupils are very proud of their school and say they feel special in the 'Gorsewood family'. They greatly value opportunities to express their views and the many chances given to represent their school, for example, as school councillors or playground mediators. They take these responsibilities very seriously, for example, when they ensure that everyone is happy and safe in the playground. The older pupils help the younger children and those who arrive part-way through the year benefit to the full from the activities available. The school takes every opportunity to involve pupils in the community through, for example, involving them in deciding which fundraising ventures they wish to support. Within these roles, pupils gain valuable skills that help them prepare for their future. As a result of the very effective work of support staff, attendance levels are improving, although remain below the national average.

The good curriculum includes imaginative links between subjects which give meaning to pupils' learning. An emphasis on creativity successfully promotes pupils' enjoyment of learning and the acquisition of a range of knowledge and skills. This themed approach is relatively new and is building up term by term. The school has yet to monitor how well it serves pupils' needs.

The school does not miss an opportunity, through excellent partnerships and community links, to foster pupils' well-being. Extra-curricular sporting and creative activities, the opportunity to learn to speak French and a breakfast club promote pupils' fitness, health and enjoyment, and are very popular. This good focus through the curriculum on developing positive attitudes to health, fitness and emotional well-being is evident in the awards the school has achieved.

The good progress pupils make throughout the school is the result of good teaching. Strengths in teaching include good use of personal target-setting to involve pupils in their own learning, high quality relationships and high expectations of behaviour. However, in a few lessons, the work set is not always sufficiently challenging to extend the learning of all pupils. The deployment of learning support assistants adds much to pupils' progress. Excellent use is made of outside agencies in helping to ensure that pupils with learning difficulties and/or disabilities and those with emotional problems are enabled to take a full part in all the school has to offer.

Good leadership and management have ensured that all previous inspection issues have been addressed and that the school has moved on effectively. The school's accurate self-evaluation ensures that the school knows itself well and contributes to exceedingly clear direction and sustained improvement. As a result, the school is in a good position to improve. Governors understand the school's strengths and priorities. They provide good support and appropriate challenge to the school's leaders. Arrangements are in place to meet health and safety requirements, including child protection procedures. Leaders and managers closely monitor pupils' progress to ensure that targets are met. This is particularly successful in ensuring that those who find learning difficult are given great care and support which enables them to enjoy school and make good progress.

Effectiveness of the Foundation Stage

Grade: 2

A significant proportion of children enter Reception with skills that are well below those typical for their age, in particular in writing and using letter sounds. Good quality teaching ensures that children receive a good start to their education. Daily learning of letters and sounds help to boost children's skills in reading and writing. Activities are well chosen to encourage children's independence and care of others. Leadership and management are good; assessment information is used well to match tasks to children's needs in the classroom and in the outdoor environment. This allows children to achieve well in all areas of learning, although by the time children leave the Foundation Stage most are working towards the levels typically expected. There are excellent partnerships with parents, who appreciate the welcoming ethos and excellent care their children receive. Links with the adjacent pre-school are well developed and enable a smooth transition to the Reception year.

What the school should do to improve further

  • Monitor changes in the curriculum to ensure that pupils' needs are always fully met.

Annex A

Inspection judgements

Key to judgements: grade 1 is outstanding, grade 2 good, grade 3 satisfactory, and grade 4 inadequateSchool Overall
Overall effectiveness
How effective, efficient and inclusive is the provision of education, integrated care and any extended services in meeting the needs of learners?2
Effective steps have been taken to promote improvement since the last inspection Yes
How well does the school work in partnership with others to promote learners' well-being?1
The effectiveness of the Foundation Stage2
The capacity to make any necessary improvements2
Achievement and standards
How well do learners achieve?2
The standards1 reached by learners3
How well learners make progress, taking account of any significant variations between groups of learners2
How well learners with learning difficulties and disabilities make progress2
1 Grade 1 - Exceptionally and consistently high; Grade 2 - Generally above average with none significantly below average; Grade 3 - Broadly average to below average; Grade 4 - Exceptionally low.
Personal development and well-being
How good is the overall personal development and well-being of the learners?1
The extent of learners' spiritual, moral, social and cultural development1
The extent to which learners adopt healthy lifestyles1
The extent to which learners adopt safe practices1
How well learners enjoy their education1
The attendance of learners3
The behaviour of learners2
The extent to which learners make a positive contribution to the community2
How well learners develop workplace and other skills that will contribute to their future economic well-being1
The quality of provision
How effective are teaching and learning in meeting the full range of the learners' needs?2
How well do the curriculum and other activities meet the range of needs and interests of learners?2
How well are learners cared for, guided and supported?1
Leadership and management
How effective are leadership and management in raising achievement and supporting all learners?2
How effectively leaders and managers at all levels set clear direction leading to improvement and promote high quality of care and education1
How effectively leaders and managers use challenging targets to raise standards2
The effectiveness of the school's self-evaluation2
How well equality of opportunity is promoted and discrimination tackled so that all learners achieve as well as they can2
How effectively and efficiently resources, including staff, are deployed to achieve value for money 2
The extent to which governors and other supervisory boards discharge their responsibilities 2
Do procedures for safeguarding learners meet current government requirements?Yes
Does this school require special measures?No
Does this school require a notice to improve?No

Annex B

Text from letter to pupils explaining the findings of the inspection

Thank you for making me very welcome and helping me complete my work. I really enjoyed visiting your school because you were all very polite and friendly. All the children I talked to told me how much they like belonging to the 'Gorsewood family', and your parents told me they are very happy with the school too. I saw you working hard in class and it was good to see you all playing together happily outside. One thing that really impressed me was the way you care for each other. It was also good to see you moving around the building sensibly and carefully. Here are some of the things I found out.

  • You go to a good school where you thoroughly enjoy learning, try hard and make good progress in your work.
  • The quality of teaching you receive is good.
  • You have an excellent understanding of how to stay safe and keep healthy.
  • The school provides lots of interesting activities, takes very good care of you and makes sure everyone gets the help they need.

I have asked the staff to do one thing: to put in checks which will see how well you are learning when you do your topic work.

You can help the staff by working hard and always doing your best. Your parents can help by making sure you all arrive at school every day so that you do not miss out on the fun times and good learning opportunities your school has to offer. I hope you will continue to enjoy school and wish you well for the future.

Any complaints about the inspection or the report should be made following the procedures set out in the guidance 'Complaints about school inspections', which is available from Ofsted's website: ofsted.gov.uk.

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