School etc

Brooke House College

Brooke House College
Leicester Road
Market Harborough
Leicestershire
LE167AU

01858 462452

Headteacher: Mr J Stanford

School holidays for Brooke House College via Leicestershire council

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186 pupils aged 12—19y mixed gender
225 pupils capacity: 83% full

130 boys 70%

14y315y1116y2817y4118y3419 ≥10

55 girls 30%

14y316y917y1318y1919 ≥10

Last updated: Sept. 15, 2014


— Other Independent School

URN
120341
Establishment type
Other Independent School
Establishment #
6005
Open date
Sept. 5, 1991
OSGB coordinates
Easting: 473154, Northing: 287591
GPS coordinates
Latitude: 52.481, Longitude: -0.92425
Accepting pupils
14—19 years old
Boarders
1
Boarding establishment
Has boarders
Census date
Jan. 16, 2014
Region › Const. › Ward
East Midlands › Harborough › Market Harborough-Great Bowden and Arden
Area
Urban > 10k - less sparse
Admissions policy
Non-selective
Sixth form
Has a sixth form
Learning provider ref #
10015103

Rooms & flats to rent in Market Harborough

Schools nearby

  1. 0.1 miles Market Harborough Church of England Primary School LE169QH (369 pupils)
  2. 0.2 miles Market Harborough Church of England Primary School LE169QH
  3. 0.3 miles Saint Joseph's Catholic Primary School Market Harborough Leicestershire LE169BZ
  4. 0.3 miles The Robert Smyth School LE167JG
  5. 0.3 miles The Robert Smyth Academy LE167JG (1258 pupils)
  6. 0.3 miles St Joseph's Catholic Voluntary Academy LE169BZ (196 pupils)
  7. 0.5 miles Market Harborough Ridgeway Primary School LE167HQ
  8. 0.5 miles Welland Park Community College LE169DR
  9. 0.5 miles Welland Park Academy LE169DR (694 pupils)
  10. 0.5 miles Market Harborough Ridgeway Primary School LE167HQ (284 pupils)
  11. 0.8 miles Little Bowden School LE168AY (375 pupils)
  12. 1 mile Great Bowden Church of England Primary School LE167HZ
  13. 1 mile Meadowdale Primary School LE167XQ
  14. 1 mile Meadowdale Primary School LE167XQ (392 pupils)
  15. 1 mile Great Bowden Church of England Primary School LE167HZ (114 pupils)
  16. 1.1 mile Farndon Fields Primary School LE169JH
  17. 1.1 mile Farndon Fields Primary School LE169JH (193 pupils)
  18. 1.6 mile Lubenham All Saints Church of England Primary School LE169TW
  19. 1.6 mile Lubenham All Saints Church of England Primary School LE169TW (94 pupils)
  20. 2.3 miles Foxton Primary School LE167QZ (89 pupils)
  21. 2.7 miles Braybrooke Primary School LE168LD
  22. 3.6 miles Church Langton Church of England Primary School LE167SZ (190 pupils)
  23. 3.9 miles Clipston Endowed Voluntary Controlled Primary School LE169RU (116 pupils)
  24. 4.8 miles Kibworth High School & Community Technology College LE80LG

List of schools in Market Harborough


Brooke House College

Independent school standard inspection report

DfE registration number 855/6005
Unique Reference Number (URN) 120341
Inspection number 361351
Inspection dates 13–14 October 2010
Reporting inspector Mark Mumby HMI

No. 090070

Independent school standard inspection report

3

Purpose and scope of the inspection

This inspection was carried out by Ofsted under Section 162A of the Education Act
2002, as amended by schedule 8 of the Education Act 2005, the purpose of which is
to advise the Secretary of State for Education about the school’s suitability for
continued registration as an independent school.

1, 2

Information about the school

Brooke House College provides education for male and female students aged 14 to

21 years. The college caters predominantly for students from abroad, although a

small number of British students attend the college. Virtually all of the current
students reside at the college. For the majority of the students, English is not their
principal language.
The college aims to prepare students for higher education predominantly in British
universities, by enabling them to attain the appropriate academic entry requirements
and, where appropriate, through the development of their proficiency in English.
The college is privately owned and is located in the small town of Market Harborough
in rural Leicestershire. It opened in 1965 and is registered for 225 students. There
are currently 203 full-time students on roll. The educational provision of the college
was last inspected by Ofsted in December 2007. The residential provision was last
inspected by Ofsted in February 2010.

Evaluation of the school

Brooke House College provides a good quality of education for its students and
meets its aims successfully. It has made significant improvements since the last
inspection to improve the quality of teaching and to address shortcomings in
assessment and careers guidance. However, the college has paid too little attention

to some aspects of safeguarding and students’ welfare, health and safety.

Consequently, a number of important regulations are now not met and the provision

for students’ welfare, health and safety is inadequate.

Quality of education

The overall quality of education is good. The curriculum is good. Its strengths lie in
the range and quality of courses that students have access to and in the ways in

which each student’s personal interests and talents are accommodated. Almost all

students enrol in the college with a clear pathway to a career or higher education.
Schemes of work are structured to enable students to attain relevant qualifications

1

www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2002/ukpga_20020032_en_14#pt10-ch1-pb4-l1g162

2

www.opsi.gov.uk/ACTS/acts2005/ukpga_20050018_en_15#sch8

Independent school standard inspection report

4

and develop their English language skills at the same time. Students in Key Stage 3
and Key Stage 4 take two- or three-year GCSE courses, having a good range of
options available to them, including the football academy. There is a good emphasis
on building up key skills in mathematics, science, and information and
communication technology (ICT). Post-16 students select from a good range of A
level programmes, the football academy or the foundation learning course. A strong
personal, social, health and citizenship education (PSHE) programme has been put
into place, taught by the personal tutors in the evenings. Students value the way this
programme helps them to plan for their future and to develop their understanding of
different cultures. All this prepares them well for the next steps of their education.
The introduction of the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme and the good range of
sporting activities and visits, during and after the school day, enrich the curriculum
further.
The quality of teaching and assessment is good. Students make good progress
because they are fully engaged in purposeful learning in lessons. This is the result of
teachers using their very good subject knowledge to plan learning activities which
are well-matched to the students’ individual needs as well as to their personal
interests. Small teaching groups ensure that teachers are able to assess progress
accurately during each lesson and provide effective support whenever it is needed.
This is particularly the case in developing the students’ English language skills which
was a strength seen in every lesson observed. Teachers use a good range of
strategies, moving quickly between direct teaching and independent work, resulting
in a good pace of learning in lessons. Students have very good attitudes; they are
keen to learn and readily take on responsibility to develop their own learning. A
strength of the most effective lessons observed was the very good use of plenary
sessions when the teacher drew the learning together for the whole group,
reinforcing specialist language to promote the development of English language skills
further. Homework evolves naturally from lessons and is suitably challenging
showing the good links which exist between the education and residential provision.
Learning resources are adequate, but opportunities to extend learning through the
use of technology are occasionally limited. For example, students do not always
make sufficient use of computers to analyse scientific data. Opportunities to use ICT
to extend learning in the residences are restricted because internet access away
from the main teaching areas is frequently slow.
Marking is clear, detailed, accurate and thorough. Teachers use high levels of praise
and encouragement to acknowledge success and motivate the students. Marking
gives a very clear indication of how well students have done and excellent guidance
for improvement. Developmental points are based on examination criteria and are
linked closely to work covered in lessons.
The college has recognised the need to improve assessment systems. Last year it
introduced assessments each half term to monitor students’ progress. This system
was used effectively to inform the termly reports to parents and carers in the first
instance. It is now being developed further to improve the guidance students receive
to help them improve their work. The college is also developing the way in which it
measures its success and compares its performance with other institutions.

Independent school standard inspection report

5

Appropriate use is being made of data available from examination boards to achieve
this.

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils

Provision for students’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is good.

Spirituality is developed effectively through strong pastoral support and the

celebration of students’ achievements. Behaviour is good. There is a strong ethos of

mutual respect and concern for the individual which is reflected in the way students
relate to their peers and adults. High expectations and the different elements studied
across the curriculum, particularly in PSHE, support students’ very clear
understanding of right and wrong and their respect for traditions, cultures and rules.
This is a strongly inclusive, harmonious community. There were many examples of
students supporting each other both in lessons and as they moved between them.
They mostly really enjoy their lessons and, although some naturally miss their
homes, almost all say they feel that they are making good progress. Their
attendance is good, although occasionally punctuality could be improved. This is a
culturally diverse community in which all students say that they feel comfortable and
at ease. They develop a good understanding of public institutions in England through
the rich curriculum supplemented by educational visits. Students are encouraged to

celebrate each other’s cultures through international days, their course work and

other projects locally such as singing in local churches.

Welfare, health and safety of pupils

The provision for students’ welfare, health and safety is inadequate because the
college has not paid sufficient regard to its responsibilities for child protection. The

college’s policy for safeguarding children is brief and provides too little guidance for

staff such as the signs which may indicate abuse. The policy has not been fully
implemented as the designated senior member of staff for child protection has not
undertaken appropriate training. No member of staff or of the proprietorial body has
undertaken training in safer recruitment and this is reflected in a lack of consistency
seen when recruitment records were scrutinised during the inspection. The college
has prepared a set of rules and a disciplinary procedure, but has not implemented a
policy to promote good behaviour as required by the regulations. There is no first aid
policy to provide clear guidance for staff. Nevertheless, there is a full-time matron
and qualified first aiders work on each of the college’s sites. The college does not
maintain attendance registers in line with requirements because the college’s system
does not ensure that all students are registered at the start of the morning and
afternoon sessions. The symbols used in registers do not distinguish between
authorised and unauthorised absence.
The college has taken appropriate action to ensure that the premises are safe. The
health and safety policy is suitable and regularly reviewed. Appropriate risk
assessments for the premises and for fire safety have been carried out. Records of
fire evacuations and equipment tests indicate that these take place routinely.
However, the staff have not received any fire safety training.

Independent school standard inspection report

6

Students say that they feel safe and well cared for in the college. Newly arrived
students commented on the warm welcome they received, praising the tutors for the
support they provide. They report no bullying and say that students from a wide
range of backgrounds and cultures get on very well together. Most students have
good attitudes towards leading a healthy lifestyle. They appreciate the opportunities

they have to use the town’s leisure centre for physical exercise and are generally

happy with the diet they receive at mealtimes.
The school has prepared a three-year accessibility plan in accordance with the
Disability Discrimination Act 1995, amended by the Special Educational Needs and
Disability Act 2001.

Suitability of staff, supply staff and proprietors

The college carries out appropriate checks prior to the appointment of all staff to
ensure their suitability to work with children. However, the college’s single central
record of staff checks does not fully comply with the regulations because it does not
include details of the dates when specific checks were made or who carried out the
checks.

Premises of and accommodation at the school

The college’s teaching accommodation is housed in a range of buildings on four

different sites in Market Harborough. The sites are all within a short walking distance
of each other. They are maintained in good order. There are suitable specialist
rooms for science teaching and an appropriately equipped room for ICT. Students

also benefit from facilities at the town’s leisure centre for physical education as well

as extra-curricular activities. Those students who attend the football academy make

good use of the town’s football club.

Provision of information

The college provides all of the required information to parents and prospective
parents through its prospectus and information pack. Parents and carers are kept
well informed about the progress and attainment of their children through three
reports each year.

Manner in which complaints are to be handled

The school has a published complaints procedure which meets all of the regulations
with one exception. The procedure does not provide for written records to be kept of
all complaints.

Independent school standard inspection report

7

Compliance with regulatory requirements

The proprietor has ensured that the school meets The Education (Independent
School Standards) (England) Regulations 2010, schedule 1 (‘the Regulations’), with
the exception of those listed below.

3

The school does not meet all requirements in respect of provision for welfare, health
and safety of pupils (standards in part 3) and must:

  • ensure that arrangements made to safeguard and promote the welfare of
    pupils at the school have regard to guidance issued by the Secretary of
    State (paragraph 7)
  • prepare and implement a written policy to promote good behaviour
    amongst pupils which sets out the sanctions to be adopted in the event
    of pupils misbehaving (paragraph 9)
  • prepare and implement a written policy on first aid (paragraph 14)
  • maintain attendance registers in accordance with the Education (Pupil
    Registration) (England) Regulations 20064 (paragraph 17).

The school does not meet all requirements in respect of suitability of staff, supply
staff and proprietors (standards in part 4) and must:

  • ensure that the college’s single central record of staff checks includes the
    date when checks were carried out and the identity of the person who
    carried out the checks (paragraphs 22 (3), 22 (4), 22 (6) and 22 (7)).

The school does not meet all requirements in respect of the manner in which
complaints are to be handled (standards in part 7) and must:

  • ensure the complaints procedure provides for written records to be kept
    of all complaints, indicating whether they were resolved at the
    preliminary stage or whether they proceeded to a panel hearing
    (paragraph 25 (j)).

3

www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010/1997/contents/made

4

www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2006/20061751.htm

Independent school standard inspection report

8

Inspection judgements
outstanding
good satisfactory inadequate

The quality of education

Overall quality of education
How well the curriculum and other activities meet the range of needs
and interests of pupils
How effective teaching and assessment are in meeting the full range
of pupils’ needs
How well pupils make progress in their learning

Pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development

Quality of provision for pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural
development
The behaviour of pupils

Welfare, health and safety of pupils

The overall welfare, health and safety of pupils

Independent school standard inspection report

9

School details

School status Independent
Type of school International boarding school
Date school opened 5 September 1991
Age range of pupils 14–21
Gender of pupils Mixed
Number on roll (full-time pupils) Boys: 129 Girls: 74 Total: 203
Number on roll (part-time pupils) Boys: 0 Girls: 0 Total: 0
Number of boarders Boys: 119 Girls: 72 Total: 191
Number of pupils with a statement of
special educational needs
Boys: 0 Girls: 0 Total: 0
Number of pupils who are looked after Boys: 0 Girls: 0 Total: 0
Annual fees (day pupils) £12,990
Annual fees (boarders) £21,750
Address of school Leicester Road,Market Harborough,
Leicestershire, LE16 7AU
Telephone number 01858 462452
Email address dawn.savage@brookehouse.com
Headteacher Mr Giles Williams (Principal)
Proprietor Mr Donald Williams

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